Egypt Eighteenth Dynasty Tombs

           

 

 

  

 


 
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The era of Egypt` s 18th dynasty was one of power and wealth for Egypt. Hatshepsut was a pharaoh woman, a rare thing meet in the history of the ancient Egypt. She was a competent and brave ruler who extended the Egyptian trading to the South, the territory where Somalia is today, and in the North the Mediterranean Sea. Hatshepsut was the Egypt` s pharaoh for twenty years proving a unusual political dexterity. During the reign of the Amenophis III that lasted from 1417 BC to 1379 BC, Egypt became so wealthy that it was not necessary the trying of expanding its influence. He was follow at throne by Amenophis IV, who changed his name in Akhenaten; he was the one to move the capital of Egypt in a new town called by him Akhetaten. The pharaoh Akhenaten created and imposed a monotheist religion, based on Aten, forbidding the veneration of other gods. The relation between the introduction of the monotheism by Akhenaten and the Bible` s character Moise, which is localized in Egypt in a similar but not necessary identical, is not clear and still controversial. The eighteenth dynasty` s tomb varies in decorations, style and localization. From this period we have the tomb of Hatshepsut, KV 20, which has a unique shape, the corridor of access having 200 meters, the mortuary chamber being at 97 meters underground, the tomb of Tutmes III, KV 34 and the tomb of Tutmes IV, KV 43. The most impressive tomb of all being the one of Amenhotep III, WV 22, situated in the West Valley. In the period of the 18th dynasty, the important nobles begin to be buried with the royal family, the most known common tomb being the one of Yuya and Tjuyu, KV 46.

 
 

 

Egypt Eighteenth Dynasty Tombs

 

 
   

 

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