Egypt Egyptian Sarcophage

           

 

 

  

 


 
  Copyright www.egypt-cairo.com

 

An Egyptian sarcophagus is a coffin of stone. The sarcophagus translation means ‘flesh eater’; this may explain why some scholars think that the early coffins, which were made of limestone, had the role of quickly dissolving the body. The stone coffins used by the Egyptians of the 3 rd dynasty, represented the architecture`s mud brick palaces, with false windows and doors ornamental arrangements. Starting with the 11th dynasty, on the Lebanese Coast and also in Egypt, were used sarcophagi of limestone or wood, with a shape of a box. The coffins from the 17th dynasty had a shape made to resemble the human`s shape with a portrait head carved, of pasted papyrus sheets. Later were used stones, pottery or wood. The royalty could afford to have coffins of silver and even solid gold. The upper classes of the 18th, 19th and 20th dynasties used to enclose the inner coffins made of metal or wood in outer sarcophagi made from stone; this practice was also used in the Ptolemaic period. Some sarcophagi from the New Kingdom are made from one piece of wood, covered with gesso and linen, and carefully painted; they are examples of those time art. Close to the Egypt` s Giza pyramids was found the oldest pyramid, in perfect shape, and having inside a mummy old of 4.500 years. The area where the sarcophagus was found is situated at two kilometers from the Sphinx` s South-East, in a plateau`s area used as the pyramids workers` cemetery. The sarcophagus dates from the Khufu` s reign, the one who built the Great Pyramid. According to the hieroglyphs found on the tomb, it belonged to Ny-Nsw-Wesert, (an administrative district's overseer), who was taking care of the temples, tombs and pyramids around Giza.

 
 

 

Egypt Egyptian Sarcophage

 

 
   

 

Copyrights for all pictures on this site, it is and remains the property of www.egypt-cairo.com

   2007 - 2011  www.egypt-cairo.com