Egypt CAIRO TRANSPORT

           

  

 

 

           

 

 

Egypt Cairo Transport

 

Egypt Cairo Transport

 

Transport in Cairo
 

First-class train companies connect Cairo with Alexandria, Luxor and Aswan, but other local services are badly in need of an upgrade. A combination of bus and ferry deals will get you safely at Aqaba in Jordan. A bus transport is also available to and from Libya.
Cairo's train system is surprisingly efficient, and the stations are really clean. It's also very cheap and, outside rush hours, not too crowded.

 

More and more Cairenes are using private microbuses to get around. Destinations are not written on microbus routes, so they are tricky to get around unless you are used to their routes.

 

Overcrowded buses and minibuses are still the most usual form of getting around for the masses, but for anyone who prefers breathing while traveling; taxis are the only way to go. By Western standards, taxis are very reasonable and there's always one available.


The only instances when they aren't the best bet are for long traveling, in which case they can get really expensive. A new addition to the usual black and white taxis are the many limousines, some luxurious Mercedes, others reasonably new saloons, all with air-conditioning and always with functioning front and back seatbelts.

Called by phone, they are not recommended for quick trips but are great for longer journeys or daily hire. Don't believe those who tell you that there is no bus available to the city centre from the airport - there are in fact, two, plus a minibus.

 

 

Called by phone, they are not recommended for quick trips but are great for longer journeys or daily hire. Don't believe those who tell you that there is no bus available to the city centre from the airport - there are in fact, two, plus a minibus.
 

 

 

Driving in Cairo is not for the neophyte driver. It can get very dangerous as local drivers are quite reckless. The river bus terminal is at Maspero, on the Corniche in front of the big round TV building. Boats depart frequently for University, a landing over on the Giza side of the river, just north of the University Bridge.
 
Cairo Transport

Every second boat goes on to south to Manial, Rhoda, Giza and Masr al-Qadima (Old Cairo). The last stop is convenient for Coptic Cairo. Most of Cairo's trams (known to Cairenes as 'metros') are no longer working. One of the few tram lines left which visitors might use is the one connecting central Cairo to Heliopolis.

The best and most reliable public transport in Cairo is the Metro, which has the added advantage of being very easy on the pocket. The route connects Helwan in the south of the city to Heliopolis in the north with various branches to Shubra, Ataba and Abdin. There is also a subway connecting Giza and Shubra.

 

Trains travels from 5.30am to midnight, the first carriage of each is for women only. The avenues of Cairo are redolent with taxis, which may have a fare meter but it is not often used. Fares are not fixed and should be negotiated before the ride and are often shared. Taxis from hotels usually cost double that of flagged taxis.
 

 

 

The bus and minibus services running in the city are considered risky for visitors because of overcrowding and the risk of getting pick pocketed. You also need a working knowledge of Arabic to take buses. Walking is quite a good option for experiencing the atmosphere of Cairo. But be warned, streets are not labeled and maps are not much help, so it is easy to lose your way.
 

 

 

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